8 things your solar contractor isn't telling you.

Everyone has taken a leap of faith when choosing to invest in a new stock, project or piece of equipment. Risk is a necessary part of any investment. But, the risks are always lower when a buyer knows the facts. As more and more Americans make the switch to solar, it is imperative that they know exactly what goes into a solar installation, what the industry standards are and, even more importantly, what could go wrong. To ensure that everyone who wants to switch to solar knows exactly what they will (and in many cases, will not) be paying for, SunPower by Green Convergence has created this list of 8 things your solar contractor probably isn’t telling you.

1. The answers to any and all of your questions

Your contractor's job is to educate you about your decision to go solar. Before deciding which solar company to go solar with, schedule an appointment with a consultant at each company you are interested in. Make sure they are knowledgeable, professional, and most importantly, informative. Did you learn anything, or were they just trying to get you to sign a lease? Many companies know that they have one shot to close the deal because their system is not really worth the cost. The contractor to choose is solar contractor that is willing to answer any question you have about your system and has the experience and the expertise necessary to install your system promptly and properly.


2. The brand of the panels they plan to install

Make sure you know what kind of panels your solar contractor plans to install. Not all panels are the same. Some are more efficient and more durable than others. Always request or research the panels through a third party source to be sure your panels will last.

3. The way that the panels will be installed

Make sure you know exactly how they plan to install your panels. Whether they will be mounting them over your tiles or removing the tiles on your roof to make space for the panels, you must make sure that your installers have roofing experience. Your roof will be vulnerable to leaks and damaged tiles if your solar contractor does not have experienced roofers installing your panels.

4. Their references and who’s writing them

Make sure you get third party references and referrals of the solar contractor you choose. Use Yelp, Angie’s list and other similar sites to ensure that the solar contractor you choose is the right price and the right business for the job.

5. Their previous installations and what they look like

Make sure you have seen their work. Get addresses of their previous jobs. Drive by and see the installs in person so you choose the contractor that will maintain your home’s curb appeal. Learn More: http://bit.ly/1x1O7M5

6. Their panel warranty program

Remember that the industry standard is a ten year warranty. The best warranty you can get is 25 years. Don’t settle for anything less than the best.

7. Their roof warranty program

Many companies don’t make sure their roof installation work is warrantied as well as their panels. Make sure your roof warranty matches your panel warranty. Otherwise, your home’s roof may be vulnerable to leaks and other structural problems in the future.

8. The licenses the solar company maintains

Licensing is crucial to choosing a solar contractor. Make sure you know if they are 1st licensed contractors, or if they are subcontracting? Ask if they have a C-46 Solar, C-10 Electrical or C-39 Roofing license. Installing solar requires expertise in electrical work, roofing, and solar construction. If they don’t have licenses, they won’t be prepared to do a quality job. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1mpxvtL

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